Read a Poem or Two

Where my work can be found online:

Anti

Avatar Review

Blast Furnace

Boxcar Poetry Review

Coal Hill Review

Country Dog Review

Ecotone

Escape Into Life

The Fiddleback

Fried Chicken and Coffee

Hobble Creek Review

Innisfree

Labor

the minnesota review

Poemeleon

Strange Horizons

Watershed

Weave

My poems have also appeared (or are forthcoming) in 5 AM, The Barn Owl Review, Cave Wall, Cold Mountain Review, Copper Nickel, Harpur Palate, Main Street Rag, Lake Effect, Paper Street, River Styx, Slipstream, Spillway and Watershed: A Journal of the Susquehanna.

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3 Comments »

  1. Sharon Said:

    I’m working on my thesis and want to represent the invisible working-class poor, not just those who worked and had little but those still so poor they died young, they went hungry but they kept a roof over their heads. I’m having difficulty finding working-class poor poets. Most people equate the condition of being poor to ethnicity but there are many poor Caucasian’s and they seldom have a voice. They are often ignored or looked down upon because people think that they choose to be poor or that they could do better if they really worked hard. These are the people I would like to represent but I can’t find poets to read and get a feel for what’s been done and what’s needed.

    I really enjoyed reading Watershed and the rest of your poems. Do you have any suggestions about poets that might come from the poor background?

    I also really love your website. It is so professional and so well done. It is easy to navigate and filled with so much information! Thank you!

  2. Sharon Said:

    Oh and I love “Dirt Sisters.” Your images bring back memories of scraped knees and mud caked shoes! “She Likes to Work the Graveyard Shift,” is excellent. The images bring to life the smell of the diner, the stale coffee, the sweat of hard work. Thank you for making your poetry available here.

  3. […] a look at some of her poems, I highly recommended checking out her blog. The precision of her language is both remarkable and inspiring. Among some of my personal […]


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